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20121101
20121130
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KRCB (PBS) 28
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the streets this weekend. >> now that we know who our president is and what he's willing to do for us, we are even more excited about getting him re-elected. >> this morning we hit 600 houses. this afternoon we probably hit about 20 or 0 houses. not everybody was home but enough people were home that we were able to spread the word. >> woodruff: we assess the polls and the state of the race on election eve with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> ifill: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage and taxes, we break down ballot measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in n
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fromiers like you. thank you. >> brown: there was no let-up today in the battle between israel and hamas, the palestinian group that rules gaza. air strikes echoed across gaza, and rockets landed near tel aviv and, for the firs
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other w
model is at war with life on this planet. it's at war with us." >> and-- >> there's something fundamentally flawed about a system where in order to get elected the members of congress have to rely on the very people who are lobbying them day in and day out. because that's their principal source of funding, those lobbyists and the interests they represent. >> funding is provided by: carnie corporation onew york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the be
to have you with us. like many others in the nation, faith groups are assessing the impact of this week's election. according to exit polls, president obama won a slight majority of catholic voters overall, thanks largely to strong support from latino catholics. mitt romney won the white catholic vote by an almost 20-point margin. almost 80% of evangelicals who voted voted for romney. black protestants went overwhelmingly for obama, as did the vast majority of jews. but the biggest share of obama's faith coalition was voters who say they aren't affiliated with any religion. steve schneck was co-chair of catholics for obama. he says while issues like abortion, religious liberty and gay marriage were important, in the end, it was the economy that tipped the scale for the president. >> all of these religious issues, while they are important to religious voters, i think, even among religious voters, they ranked these issues a little further down on the spectrum. >> ralph reed of the faith and freedom coalition admitted that a massive mobilization among religious conservatives wasn't enough
'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. much of the east coast is still grappling with the devastation of hurricane sandy. the storm affected at least 17 states, caused massive flooding and left millions without power. religious leaders, including pope benedict xvi, prayed for the victims and for a strong recovery. and many faith-based groups quickly rallied to help those impacted by the storm. among them, the north american mission board, the relief arm of the southern baptist convention. mike ebert is the mission board's vice president for communications. he joins us from the board's headquarters in atlanta, georgia. mike, welcome. let me begin with getting -- inviting you to talk about the extent of the sbc's efforts here. how many people do you have? what are you doing? >> well, bob, we have 82,000 trained disaster relief volunteers. 1,500 disaster relief units and we will by monday be at a 400,000 meal capacity. so we'll be preparing 400,000 hot meals to be served to victims and other first responders and that will be kind of the beginning point for us. we'll
heroes because they stood up and said, "you are not going to take the vote away from us." some people stood in line for six, seven and eight hours. some had been in areas that had been damaged by the storm. and i just think that they were there upholding democracy. so that's the first thing that i remember about it. >> they were also there making delicious pecan tarts. because when i voted, the kids in the school were selling baking goods, and they were having a great time of it. what will you remember? >> oh, that's a tough one to say. i think that for a lot of conservatives and a lot of republicans this was a very disappointing election that opened a lot of folks'yes some of the deeper changes that have happened in the country, much more so in some respects than the 2008 election -- which i think a lot of folks wrote off as a one off, as a fluke, something that reflected very unique historical circumstances. but i think this election really did demonstrate that there's been a dramatic change, particularly with regard to social issues and how folks talk about them. so i think that th
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contribuionto yr ps stion om viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session. the presi
to help us." that's my mandate. i don't presume that because i won an election, that everybody suddenly agrees with me on any... everything. >> reporter: and the president directly challenged republicans to drop the tax breaks for the better-off. >> a modest tax increase on the wealthy is not going to break their backs. they'll still be wealthy, and it will not impinge on business investment. but what i will not do is to have a process that is vague, that says we're going to sort of, kind of raise revenue through dynamic scoring or closing loopholes that have not been identified. and the reason i won't do that is because i don't want to find ourselves in a position six months from now or a year from now where, lo and behold, the only way to close the deficit is to sock it to middle-class families >> reporter: still, mr. oba stopped short of saying flatly that it's a deal breaker if republicans insist on keeping tax rates for the rich where they are now. >> i'm less concerned about red lines, per se. what i'm concerned about is not finding ourselves in a situation where the wealthy aren'
news. >> we will get to climate change next. >> for us to say that this is what i generation and will not happen again, i think it would be shortsighted. part of learning from this is the recognition that climate change is a reality, extreme weather is a reality. >> new york governor andrew cuomo also said that 100-year storms are coming every two years. hate to bring his name up, but how or predicted this. -- al gore predicted this. >> he sure did. >> they have seeress in the netherlands -- sea barriers in the netherlands. >> this may not be a question of the sea barriers. this heavy jet stream that came through -- that is caused by some of the warming taking place in the arctic. hence global warming is a problem. >> but back to al gore. al gore dinot talk about the environment when he was running for president, and these guys did not talk -- >> when he was running in 1988 he talked about it. >> when you have the mitt romney as governor running against this obama, their positions would not have been different mitt romney ndorser of cap- and-trade. >> tre ia hu disconnect, be
we know some of you are, you can also follow us tonight on our multichannel live stream. there can find up-to-the-minute results on our interactive map center. you can find a live election blog. you can find speeches from the winners and losers that will be coming along later tonight, and a whole lot more. >> ifill: here with us in our election night studio, which is very spiffy, if i say so myself, as they will be all evening long-- they're spiffy, too, and how lon-- >> woodruff: especially when you see the overhead shot. >> ifill: mark shield, and david brooks, and michael beschloss, and richard norton smith, and we're going to talk among ourselves for just a moment what we see coming. what are you watching for, david? >> florida and virginia right now. you want-- >> ifill: do you have a white board? >> i wish i did. i'm not that spiffy. we talked a lot about ohio. but to get to ohio mitt romney has to hurdle florida and virginia. and we've really got no real information but little whiffes of information, looking pret competitive in both places. so the romney people should be loo
of women will hold u.s. senate seats in january. after victories in massachusetts, north dakota, hawaii, wisconsin and nebraska, five new female senators will be on capitol hill. that's 20 women senators, a net gain othre for massachusetts, north dakota, hawaii, and wisconsin, these women are the first female senators from their states. hawaii's mazie hirono will be the first asian-american female senator, and wisconsin's tammy baldwin the first openly gay senator. at least 77, possibly 79 women will take their seats in the house of representatives, only a modest gain. the number of democratic women in the house will rise from 51 to 63. republicans added one woman. in new hampshire, another first. the election of a female governor and two women to the house, makes it the first state to be led primarily by women. the classic women's issue -- reproductive rights also made history in this election becoming for the first time in decades a winning issue for democrats. >> so, congresswoman norton, what was the most historic aspect of the 2012 election? >> bonnie, the election of '12 was a str
for us, it's about what can be done by us to the hard and frustrating but necessary work of self-government. that's the principle we were founded on. >> rose: many saw this election as a choice between starkly different visions of america, particularly the role of government and how to fix the economy. throughout the campaign, president obama emphasized the need for balancing individualism with collective values. in doing so, he echoed the language of the new deal as franklin delano roosevelt once said "in our personal ambitions we're individualalists but in seeking political progress as a nation we all go up or else all go down as one people." its remains to be seen whetr the country can heal the wounds in the shadow of the fiscal cliff. we watch as president obama seeks to make good on his promises in a second term. joining me from chicago is bill daley. he served as white house chief of staff from january 2011 to january 2012. in february he was appointed as a co-chair of the president's reelection campaign. so my question first is about the politics of this election. how do y
voted again for obama because he does not have... things can change in a day. president bush left us in a very very bad position, so things cannot change in a day. so that's why i'm giving president obama another chance. >> we do have a business and it does seem to have picked up a little bit. not great, but a little bit. >> tom: coming into election day, governor romney has been leading president obama in the latest miami herald statewide florida polls by about six points. that's because of growing support for governor romney in central florida and northern florida, areas with housing markets still struggling and with unemployment rates generally above the national average. >> susie: that's really fascinating, tom, sort of like the tale of two cities. what about south florida, what about voters in the rest of florida? >> tom: south florida is an interesting case, the housing bust certainly happened here in miami in south florida. but thanks to foreign buyers coming back in, the housing market has stablized faster than in the rest of florida, and prices are actually on the rise again
in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this qstio what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider theook toy is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfall life
an escort to get into the building." they had eight or ten motorcycle police officers there to guide us through the mobs of people at the site. >> narrator: it was 47-year-old mitt romney's first campaign. >> and mitt just has this big smilon his face, and he looks at me and goes, "boy, however this turns out, this really makes it worth it." >> narrator: the race had been close. romney needed a great performance. >> i don't think he had any idea what it was going to be like, because he had never done debates under that pressure. >> narrator: he'd gotten into the race because kennedy looked weak, beatable. >> at the time ted kennedy seemed vulnerable. it was a weak period for kennedy. he looked bad, he sounded bad, and in that way he was vulnerable. >> narrator: he was dramatically overweight. there had been trouble with alcohol and women. he'd mortgaged his house to stay in the race. >> romney was everything ted kennedy was not. you know, he had this clean family life. he was a really good speaker. he was really athletic and he had a good kind of campaign visage. >> people knew that he
heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one day away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow rose 19 points, the nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for those coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow's big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play in sort of a turmoil time, that change is always viewed as
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. d. this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with the election over, there's new talk in washington about finally coming to grips with taxes, spending and the deficit. the mammoth problem has been hanging over congress and president for many months, and now, time is running out. in just five days, lawmakers troop back to the capitol for a final, lame-duck session. and they are under mounting pressure to avoid going off the much-talked-about fiscal cliff. come january 1, the bush-era tax cuts will expire as will a 2% payroll tax cut that was passed in december of 2010. at the same time, large automatic spending cuts would begin to bite-- 10% less for defense in 2013 and an 8% cut in domestic programs. t
person for us. and to me it's president bra rack obama. nobody else can move us forward^. >> i would tell them to take a look at exactly where we are in this country today. what's the environment. economically we are extraordinarily troubled times. we have a president that cannot balance the budget, doesn't send a budget that gets any votes up to the hill. so that's what i would say that women who are undecided need to look at, how do we turn that around? the answer is to those concerns is to take a look at what mitt romney promises to do. >> why did the gender gap finally re-emerge in the president's favor so definitively in the last few days of campaigning. >> candidly, bonnie, i think it, quote, disappeared. because the president failed to mention women in that first debate. he has since made up for that and it shows in the gender gap. >> bonnie, look, fewer women have jobs today than they did under barack obama. more woman are in poverty, on food stamps, more children face larger debt than ever faced in the history of this country. real gap what president obama has promised women in w
the opposition. the 47% notion -- that is important to his presidency. >> nina, break it down for us. >> i do not think he has ndate. i think the republicans and democrats both have a mandate for compromise. when you heard from republicans -- it is like mitch mcconnell who said his job was to see that obama is never reelected. so, he has an edge year. he does have leverage. but it will be a long haul. he does need partners. >> rich mcconnell is on record as saying that -- mitch mcconnell is on the records sayi thahe knows that the election makes some people think that the republicans are going to roll over. that does not sound like compromise. >> your definition of compromise is rolling over and excepting higher tax rates. that is the democratic definition of compromise. i would never suggest bias. the president ran -- i will say it -- the most negative campaign. he did not run on his record. he could not. he did not run on a program. there is one thing he got a mandate for, and he now has a mandate to raise the top tax rate on two percent of the population by four. ? that is the smallest man
. that's an early night for us all. althoughs pennsylvania better than i do. i don't think it's been awe thenltally in play. i think there was a series of head fakes going on but that's never been a central battground. >> rose: mark? >> well, they're winning pennsylvania because this is the first campaign where no one has to make choices about money because they have enough to spend and they had extra money and there wasn't any other place to put and the public polls make it clear it's closer. the president will win by a more narrow margin than four years ago. i think that the -- i agree with matthew the fundamentals matter most of all. ohio is a tricky place, though, because while the economy is better than it was, still not particularly good. >> rose: is ohio enough for governor romney? >> if he wins the southern states and colado it's enough. >> and i think one of the conversations maybe we'll have in the aftermath of this is one of the things he's had in ohio-- and it's the electoral problem that he has had-- is that the electoral college moved from an advantage they had to a democra
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)